Meditation In Motion

Meditation has become a part of my daily routine. While this word may freak some people out, to me, meditation is simply taking the time to focus on my breathing and find inner peace and calm.  It allows me to create a space in which I’m able to be completely present, surrounded by gratitude, bliss and awareness.

I’ve deemed running as my “meditation in motion.”  I’m able to get lost in my own running world as I become aware of the sights and sounds around me.  It’s an absolutely beautiful experience.  However, it’s beauty is only prevalent if I’m in the right place mentally.

Since announcing my audacious goal of 13.1×10, people have shown a huge amount of support. (Which I am entirely grateful for, and my heart is so full!) A major question I find myself being asked is “Which will you actually race.”  And I respond honestly with, “I haven’t thought about it!”  I began exploring this question deeper: which ones should I run at race pace?  On yesterdays 13 mile run, I found my answer:

None of them.

As soon as I start to think about that phrase, “race pace,” I lose sight of the meditation and running just becomes a motion.  Narratives get created in my mind and I find myself surrounded with self judgement and criticism.  I recognized these thoughts surrounded me as I found myself looking down on my run yesterday.  The pavement (and therefore the run) seemed never ending.  Right away, I knew this is not how I want to feel on this run, or any other run whether it’s a mile long or 20 miles long.  So, I took a deep breath in and looked up.

 Now, rather than endless, my run seemed limitless. 

So, I let go of all those thoughts consumed with self doubt and criticism.  People say the only person you should be in competition with is yourself, but I respectfully disagree.  I don’t want to compete with myself from the past, creating these beliefs of how I should and could be running.  So,  I stopped.  No more reflecting on my run history from the past or creating narratives for the future.  It’s time to focus on the now and realize how perfect and beautiful this run, and any run, truly is.

PRs will come without a doubt.  Some races will be better than others.  I’ll be forced to face the heat, the hills, some wind and rain, too.  But, with my focus being meditation in motion, I’ll be able to love each and every moment, and the awareness it brings me.

I’ve found my soulmate pace: my pace in which I’m able to push myself but still have control and awareness of my breath and my surroundings.  For me, keeping a solid 8 minute pace allows me to stay in a meditative state.  There’s moments where I get lost in the run and naturally pick up the pace.  But, for me and for this goal, it’s not about pushing the pace.  It’s about staying in a place of gratitude, bliss and presence as my body carries me down a new path.  It’s about finding balance and persevering mentally.  It’s about showing my students that goal setting comes in different shapes and sizes, each ambition unique to the individual.  It’s about keeping my runs limitless.  It’s about meditation in motion.

Am I still nervous?  Of course.  Mindfulness is a practice.  Each course will bring it’s own set of challenges, it’s own way of trying to take me from mindful to mindless.  I’m confident, though, that with my purpose and students in my mind, I can and will persevere, enjoying each most steps I take.


What does meditation in motion mean to you?  How do you use motion to create a space of presence and bliss?

The Health and Fitness Fad

Health and fitness is a touchy topic.  Mostly because there are so many views of what determines how fit and healthy you are. However, among the various opinions and trends, there is one thing that is fairly consistent within the health and fitness fad:


The food we eat.  The muscles we flex.  How many of us are creating an image of health and fitness without truly leading a life of balanced wellness?  At what point do our lifestyles go from balanced to obsessive?

I speak from experience.  It took me years to actually become aware of the fact that I had disordered habits.  Why? Because my actions were masked by the image of health.  I was a runner, so obviously I was thin, right?  Wrong.  I was thin because I barely consumed enough calories to keep my organs functioning.  On top of that, I excessively worked out, obsessively doing workouts throughout the day, especially after every meal.

If you looked at certain statistics, you could claim I was healthy.  I was a fast runner.  My fastest mile was 5:40. I could do movements like push ups and squats. But, I was far from healthy.  Because I was so mentally unhealthy.  

My physical activity was sparked by anxiety, stress, and the need to feel in control.  What started as a hobby became an obsession.  Fitness consumed my life.

If you were to look at my social media pages today, you would see pictures of my food, of my muscles, of my yoga poses. It’s a way to advocate for this life style change I’ve created for myself.  Health and fitness is still a major part of my life, but in a very different way.  I’m still an avid runner.  I lift weights.  I practice yoga daily.  My love of fitness has not changed.  What has changed is my perspective of it.

We assume that working out makes us stronger, faster and better.  I went from running and doing body weight movements daily with no true nutrition to working out just 4 days a week.  Yes, I hop on my mat and stretch daily, but I only do intense activity 4 days a week.  Because that’s what keeps me balanced. 

However,  it’s not all about exercise. It’s so so so much nutrition (like literally, mostly nutrition).  I don’t work out to eat…I eat to work out live.  I need proper nutrition to fuel my body.  Not just for exercise, but for life. I went from consuming barley 1000 calories a day to a minimum of 2000+ and this is the best I’ve ever looked and felt.

None of this would be possible if it weren’t for balancing my mental health.  I had to shift my perspective of my body before I could become passionate about taking care of it, respecting it.  I meditate, I become aware of the thoughts and feelings around me.  I listen to my body.  I research and educate myself.  I try new things.

So, among all the advice, the fads, discover what best fits you, mentally and physically.  You can practice yoga all day physically without ever truly finding peace within awareness. You can flex day in and day out without ever having an ounce of respect for the strength your body demonstrates on the reg. Life is a journey. Your health and fitness can either enhance your growth or hinder it. Grow in your awareness of how you treat your mind, body and spirit as well as why you treat them this way.

Because what’s the point of going through life looking good without feeling good?

Why You Should Step Outside Your Fitness Zone


I am having the happiest of Hump Days since I started my morning with a challenge: my first pilates class at Pure Pilates.  I was awful.  It was fabulous.

Being a planner and avid organizer, I am all about routine and structure.  However, it can be easy to get stuck in your comfort zone. I’ll be the first to admit that I hate change.  But, with change comes growth, and let’s admit it: we all have room to grow.

In the past, I’ve been known to get caught up in my fitness routines.  We’ve all been there: obsessing over workouts, knowing your way of sweating is the best way, and pushing yourself to improve in your sport.  Exercise should be used as a means to bring balance to your life.  Unfortunately, obsessions (no matter the shape or form) will do anything but create balance.

Being a passionate person, I tend to become a perfectionist, even in my sport.  Instead of being perfect at the sport, I’d rather use the sport to create the perfect (healthiest) me.   And let’s be real…not every sport offers it all.  That’s why I’ve decided to step outside my fitness zone.

For the past three years, CrossFit has been my love.  It’s allowed me to become physically and mentally stronger.  Unfortunately, I’ve let me flexibility (or lack there of) slip by.  I’ve always just accepted that I was inflexible.  (Side note: that’s totally not okay.)  My most recent achievement was being able to touch my toes. 

This morning, pilates opened my eyes to how unaware I am of my body.  I compensate lack of flexibility by using strength.  My favorite thing about stepping outside my fitness comfort zone is being humbled.  I know by continuing to step outside of it will only allow me to grow, especially in the sport I love.

Here’s three reasons to step outside your fitness zone:

1. Build New Strengths: each sport has something unique to offer. Stepping outside of your fitness zone will help you see where there’s room to grow.

2. New Communities: my favorite thing about trying out new boxes and studios is meeting new people.  Each community has it’s own special-something.  Plus, who doesn’t love making new friends?

3. Being Humbled: being humbled by a new sports allows me to recognize when I’m getting too obsessive with another.  It’s possible to strengthen and grow without being compulsive about it.  It’s okay to not be the best at everything.  

So here’s my advice: switch it up.  I promise your lifts won’t suck if you decide to go to yoga or pilates instead of pumping iron.  And adding a lifting sesh may help you perfect that crow pose you’ve been fighting for.  I’m by no means saying it’s possible to do it all.  But, I am challenging you to add something new to your fitness routine, even if it is just once a week.  Find a happy balance.  You’ll see improvement in both your sport and lifestyle.